Truth from the Book

Truth from God's word

Names of the Days

Have you noticed the Bible doesn’t use names for days? It uses phrases like “The third day of the week” or “The day following.” Have you ever wondered why? The Bible has been translated hundreds of years after the names of the days became popular, so why didn’t the translators just use Tuesday instead of “The third day of the week?” The main reason is because the manuscripts are translated exactly as they state, and they say “The third day of the week.” But another reason is that God will not honor false gods in His holy Bible, and the names of the days are based on false gods.

The Greeks named the days of the week after the gods Ares, Hermes, Zeus, Aphrodite, and Cronus. The Greeks called the days of the week the “days of the Gods”. The German peoples substituted similar gods for the Roman gods, Tiu (Twia), Woden, Thor, Freya (Fria). All languages follow the names of the false gods in naming the days. We will use the Spanish language as an example.

Sunday
The word “Sunday” is based on the name of a pagan Roman holiday honoring the Sun god.
The Latin name dies solis, means “sun’s day”
It is also called Dominica, which is where the Spanish word for Sunday, domingo comes from.

Monday
The word “Monday” comes from the goddess of the Moon.
The Latin name dies lunae means “day of the moon”, which is where the Spanish word for Monday, lunes, comes from.

Tuesday
The word “Tuesday” is named after the Norse god Tyr (Tiu).
The Latin name, dies Martis “day of Mars”, which is also the Roman war god, Mars. That is where the Spanish word for Tuesday, martes, comes from.

Wednesday The word “Wednesday” comes from the Anglo-Saxon god Woden, who is identified with the Norse god Odin.
The Romans called it dies Mercurii, after their god Mercury, which is where the Spanish word for Wednesday, miércoles, comes from.

Thursday
The word “Thursday” is named after the Norse god of thunder, Thor.
The Romans named this day dies Jovis (“Jove’s Day”), after Jove (Jupiter), which is where the Spanish word for Thursday, jueves, comes from.

Friday
The word “Friday” is named after the Norse/Teutonic goddess of love and beauty, Freya (Fria).
To the Romans, this day was sacred to the goddess Venus, which is where the Spanish word for Friday, viernes, comes from.

Saturday The word for “Saturday” comes from the Roman god Saturn.
The Romans called the day dies Saturni, “Saturn’s Day”, where the Spanish word for Saturday, sábádo, comes from.

So you can see that the names for the days of the week are based on false gods. Jesus came in the fullness of time, and as such, the Bible was written in the fullness of time, before naming the days after false gods became standard in the calendar.

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